10 Commonly Mispronounced Car Names

Nothing is more embarrassing as a car guy than to be corrected on readily available knowledge. Engine displacement, fuel economy, 0-60 times; they are all objective facts, to which you can reference to take down a fellow car nut in a time of need. Things like how a car handles, or ‘which brand is better;’ are more subjective and can spark debates in the forums that last eons. Car names and their pronunciation fall into the former. There is a right way and a wrong way to pronounce a band name. So what if you look like a know-it-all by correcting someone on these names- what’s the point of learning everything there is about a car if you can’t use it to belittle someone on their lack of said knowledge….right???

Fiat 500 Abarth (AY-barth):


Abarth is an Italian racing car maker founded by Austrian-Italian Carlo Abarth in Turin in 1949. Its logo depicts a stylized scorpion on a red and yellow background.

(PHOTOS: See more Fiat 500 cars)

Veyron (VAY-ron):


The Veyron EB 16.4 is named in honor of Pierre Veyron, a Bugatti development engineer, test driver and company race driver who, with co-driver Jean-Pierre Wimille, won the 1939 24 hours of Le Mans while driving a Bugatti. The “EB” refers to Bugatti founder Ettore Bugatti and the “16.4″ refers to the engine’s 16 cylinders and 4 turbochargers.

(PHOTOS: See more Bugatti Veyron cars)

Huayra (why-rah):


It is named after Huayra-tata, which means “God of the winds” in Quechua, the official language of the Inca Empire. When more people say it for the first time, it sounds like their are gagging. They’ll get over it.

(PHOTOS: See more Pagani Huayra cars)

Gallardo (Guy-ARE-d’oh!):


The car is named after a famous breed of fighting bull and represented to many the smaller version of the Murciélago, a descendant of Lamborghini’s Jalpa from the 1980s.  Gallardo means gallant.

(PHOTOS: See more Lamborghini Gallardo cars)

Murcielago (Mercy-ah-lago):

In a continuation of Lamborghini’s tradition of naming its cars after stars from the world of bullfighting, the Murciélago was named for a fighting bull that survived 28 sword strokes in an 1879 fight against Rafael “El Lagartijo” Molina Sánchez, at the Coso de los califas bullring in Córdoba, Spain. Murciélago fought with such passion and spirit that the matador chose to spare its life, a rare honor. The bull, which came from Joaquin del Val di Navarra’s farm, was later presented as a gift to Don Antonio Miura, a noted local breeder; thus began the famed Miura line of fighting bulls, and the name for one of Lamborghini’s greatest designs.

(PHOTOS: See more Lamborghini Murcielago cars)

Porsche (porsh-uh):

Pronounced Poor-shuh, like the German pronunciation.  Goete (Guhr tuh) and Deutsche Bank (doy chuh).  Not like Poorsh.

Be careful in which circles you correct someone on this name, lest you be labeled an elitest douche. In an automotive setting, especially a car show, its perfectly acceptable to correct someone on this name.

(PHOTOS: See all Porsche cars)

Koenigsegg (CONE-ig-seg):

This one is not so much mispronounced as it is just never pronounced by some, as they give up. I mean, take one look at that name, and if you have never pronounced it before, you just might want to come up with an abreviation. If you have a problem pronouncing it, just refer to it as, “that batshit-crazy Swedish supercar maker.”

(PHOTOS: See all Koenigsegg cars)

MP4-12C (just read it more slowly, k?):


Once again, this is not as much a straight-up mispronunciation, as much as is people just can’t get the numbers and letters right. ‘MP4′ refers to part of the name for every McLaren Formula 1 chassis since 1981. Specifically, it means Marlboro Project 4 (Marlboro was the team’s sponsor from 1981 to 1996).

(PHOTOS: See more McLaren MP4-12C cars)

’12′ is in reference to McLaren’s Vehicle Performance Index; a rating system that McLaren applies to their own cars as well as the competition (apparently 11 was not a high enough setting). C is in reference to the extensive use of carbon fiber. Yeah, there’s a lot in this name.

The Entire Lincoln Lineup:

There was a time when Lincoln had some epic names. Continental, Cosmopolitan, Premiere, Zephyr, and Landau would all be great names from bygone eras. Today, Ford’s CEO can’t even get make sense of MKS, MKX, and MKZ. In a press conference in 2011, he actually called the new MKZ an MKS. That’s not good, and we’re not going to bother correcting you, because you should drive a car that actually has a name- not a trim designation.

Ferrari Suffixes:

We won’t even get into the confusing conventions for the standard Ferrari models. Many times road cars and previous race cars go by the same name. Last year, the Italian automaker named its F1 car F150- what’s that all about? Just when you get used to their naming conventions, like F360, F430 (denoting engine size, with a zero tacked on), they go and change everything.

If that wasn’t enough, they are killing us with these Italian names thrown on the end. Scaglietti (small-YET-e), Scuderia (Scoo-DARE-ee-ah), are not easy to pronounce, even after you’ve heard them spoken by a Ferrari press rep. Don’t even get me started on the previous flagship, the 599 GTB Fiorano (FEE-or-ah-NO). How much of a mouthful is that???

The 599′s replacement is called F12berlinetta, because they think their car is a twitter handle. When will it end people?!

 

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